Santorini Greek Kitchen

Boisterous, jovial, family restaurant. Traditional Greek favorites appear, as well as some fun creative dishes (saganaki shrimp was yummy). Located near Fountain Square, you can work off your baklava by going duckpin bowling or swing dancing afterwards.

El Morocco

So much more than a restaurant, El Morocco provides a true culinary immersion experience. Make sure to pencil in at least three hours for dinner, because each one of your five courses is delivered with plenty of time to digest in between. The pita bread is served with a variety of vegetable spreads including roasted green peppers, eggplant, and onion relish), and the soup is served (like the rest of the meal) without utensils of any kind. when you get to course #3, we suggest you go for the fruit tart (rather than the chicken and eggs). We tried a vegetarian dish of chick peas, roasted vegetables, and cous cous. We liked it. A lot. Dessert was baklavah and fresh fruit, a light and delicious end to a long and enjoyable dinner. We tried both red and a white Moroccan wines, but avoid the mint tea, which, although authentic and served with the cutest little potholder, tasted like hot bong water. Everything else was superb, and even if the belly dancer wouldn’t leave my husband alone, we’d still return.